Dear Mr. Fassbender: All You Really Need to Know You Learned in Kindergarten

Note: This post is written in response to the BC Minster of Education, Peter Fassbender’s, CKNW radio interview regarding the labour dispute with the public school teachers of British Columbia (BCTF). Today I took part in a live-tweet response during his interview, and I am quite distressed at what I have heard.

I intend to use all of my skills of diplomacy to be as polite as I can be, but you will very likely notice that under the thin veneer of etiquette, my sarcasm and love of irony remain.

My sense of humour is strong – and it buoys me when times are difficult or I am feeling stressed. A good laugh is restorative – and in the work with which I choose to involve myself, I know too well the ongoing challenges of advocating for social justice and the importance of finding a way to resiliency.

I am patient and kind with people and I am a notorious avoider of conflict – but today Mr. Fassbender – you raised my ire.

There are many things you said with which I disagree – but I am going to speak to two in particular.

The first was your wondering whether students in need of special education services might be being overly diagnosed. You said,  “I have a question, I don’t have the answer but my question is – do we overcategorize children?”

As public education teacher in British Columbia, as a parent of an Autistic teen, and as someone advocating for human rights for those with disabilities, I am concerned that this statement has the potential to negatively impact students and may be interpreted in a way that is dangerously misleading.

Let me explain why.

The enormous challenges faced by our public schools with the government’s systematic underfunding has made it difficult to effectively provide special education services for those students requiring it. Additionally, there are students who are in need of these services who do not meet the Ministry of Education requirements for a special education category – because they are stuck in the backlog of those awaiting assessment. So in fact – the likelihood is that number of students who are diagnosed with a disability or who are in need of special education services is actually greater that the current number of students eligible to receive them.

Why would you imply that students may be being overcategorized or overdiagnosed?

I don’t understand, and I cannot help wondering if you are only capable of thinking about the bottom line and not about the human lives attached to those numbers?

Actually, Mr. Fassbender, don’t bother answering my query – that question was rhetorical, and I will answer it myself with a couple of possible scenarios and a bit of inference on my part.

It may be that you are actually unaware that there are students who wait years for assessment, and that schools are frequently in the position that they are only able to provide a psycho-educational diagnostic assessment for one or maybe two students per year for the entire school population.

It is conceivable that you may also be unaware that the current wait time for a student to be assessed at BCCH or Sunnyhill to find out if they might be on the Autism spectrum is 18 months, and that is after they have actually gotten the referral for this assessment. I have seen this take years for some students… and for some – it – never – happens.

Having navigated this strenuous and exhaustive process with my son, I can tell you that the implication that the students are being overdiagnosed or overly categorized is disrespectful to students, their families, and the schools who are struggling to support them, and further, it is just out right inaccurate.

Perhaps you might also consider how offensive it is to imply that students are being overdiagnosed or overly categorized, when we are dealing with a public school system that has been so chronically impoverished by underfunding and a lack of appropriate services to meet the diverse learning needs of students – of all of our students.

It disturbs me greatly that you apparently have so little understanding of these difficulties, particularly when it is considered in the light of the mandate of the Ministry of Education:

…the Ministry has the following responsibilities:
• setting educational standards based on the outcomes students need to achieve;
• monitoring student performance and reporting the results to the public;
• working with partner groups to improve student and school performance;
• allocating funds for the education system; and
• overseeing the governance of the system as a whole.
~

Okay – fine – let’s assume that I have cleared this up for you, and I’ll move on.

Oh… but first, I must take you aside for a moment to have an earnest discussion about the stigma and lack of understanding faced by so many of our students who actually are diagnosed with a disability of some kind, whether it is a learning disability, or a mental health condition, a diagnosis of Autism or… some other special education category.

The message for these students is far too often that they are an inconvenience and that they are somehow a burden or taxing the system. These kinds of messages may not be deliberate, but they are embedded deeply within a system that lacks support for students with diverse learning and support needs. When there is not enough to go around – it is easy to point a finger to blame this group or that group and their accompanying needs for needing more than is available.

But that is wrong, and that is not how a school system should be run.

Additionally, when a comment like you made might be interpreted in a way that implies that a student like my son, who is Autistic, might actually be part of a group that is overdiagnosed – you are adding a potential layer of judgment that could harm our students. Our neurodivergent students, those who sometimes are referred to as having invisible disabilities, are very frequently misunderstood by others. They are sometimes misjudged as being manipulative or presumed to be misbehaving because they may not process or respond to the world as does a typically developing student. The last thing they need is the Minister of Education sending out the message that their sensory issues, tics, stims, anxiety, depression, language processing issues, trauma-based history, etc… are not real.

These students need our acceptance – not further shame, blame, and a shroud of doubt cast about the legitimacy of their challenges.

Mr. Fassbender, you are the Minister of Education.

You are entrusted with ensuring the children of our province get fine education… and yet you spend your energy combating those who are trying to ensure that this happens.

It is like Henry Ford shooting buckshot at the workers in his factory assembly line – and still expecting they will turn out marvelous cars. It just doesn’t make sense.

So now I come to my second point (and I feel I must thank you for hanging in there, as I know this is lengthy).

Today – on the air – you made a comment that seemed dismissive of teachers not having hired agents to represent the BCTF at the bargaining table, and in particular of Jim Iker (President of the BCTF) related to his having being a Kindergarten teacher (**please see end note). To me your comment seemed to be insulting to teachers, and in particular Kindergarten teachers, who deserve respect as they set the scene for the beginning of the public education journey for our students.

Seriously, have you been to Kindergarten? I will assume you have, and if not, I am quite certain that your children and grandchildren have, and I am going to take you back… way back, because I think there are a few things you have forgotten.

So here it is – and I hope you will take it to heart – because I think you would be doing the families and students of our province a great service if you were to get back in touch with some of these important lessons.

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

1. Share everything.
2. Play fair.
3. Don’t hit people.
4. Put things back where you found them.
5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.
6. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
7. Say you’re SORRY when you HURT somebody.
8. Wash your hands before you eat.
9. Flush.
10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
11. Live a balanced life – learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.
12. Take a nap every afternoon.
13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
14. Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Styrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.
15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup – they all die. So do we.
16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first word you learned – the biggest word of all – LOOK.”

Robert Fulghum, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

**A final note: “After receiving an honour’s degree in Political Science and Sociology at McMaster University, Jim enrolled at Dalhousie University in Halifax and completed his Bachelor of Education. He…chose a Grade 2/3 primary class in Topley, BC. Jim is a versatile teacher and taught kids in nearly every elementary grade—including Kindergarten. He also was a teacher/ counsellor, learning assistance, and special education teacher”. TEACHER magazine
 
SOS

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in ableism, acceptance, Autism, Autistic, BC Teachers Federation, BCTF, Educator, Neurodiversity, Special Education, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

The Ed Wiley Autism Acceptance Lending Library: Interviewing Lei

Hand in hand with speaking out and taking a stand for social justice and human rights, there is an opportunity to explore and celebrate amazing things that are happening within Disabilities and Autism communities.  There are many people creating new projects and participating in posAutive events, and expressing or amplifying the important perspectives of Autistic people and celebrating Autistic pride and culture.

One of those people is Lei Wiley-Mydske. She is the creator, curator, and Director of the Ed Wiley Autism Acceptance Lending Library.

leislibrary2.jpgYou read that right! Lei was not satisfied with the focus of the books that were available in her community, and she wanted to make books available that were supportive of neurodiversity and so she just freakin’ started her own library!!

You can probably tell I am pretty enthusiastic about Lei’s project, and I am lucky to live close enough to her that I was able to support her library fundraiser this spring, and hang out IRL now and then, but I am going to let Lei tell us more:

To begin, can you introduce yourself and share what is important to know about you?

I’m 38, I work for AWN (Autism Women’s Network) and I am married to someone who is not Autistic and we have one child who is Autistic like me.

Is there anything else that is important we know about you?

Well, I really like helping people, especially parents to understand a little more about autism. I feel like a lot of the time I might not be taken seriously, but I still keep doing it because I don’t think that things will be better for my son than they were for me if I don’t.

I don’t know anybody else who just MADE a LIBRARY! Do you remember the moment you decided to create the Library, and/or what inspired you or made you want to do so?

Well, it was a lot of things. Learning more about the laws in my state, and having my ability to parent my child questioned on the basis of my disability alone was traumatizing. It also made me want to change things so that my son would never, ever have to go through that.

My son also went through a lot of trauma in our school district because people just didn’t understand his communication. They called it non compliance when he was trying to advocate for himself. It was frustrating because I would tell teachers and administration about all of these resources like “Loud Hands” and “I Love Being My Own Autistic Self” that they had never heard of. I was actually horrified when one of the staff at his school said they had never met an Autistic adult before me. I just think if you want to work with Autistic people, you need to listen to us.

Very few people had even heard of Temple Grandin. I mean, she’s probably the most famous Autistic person around and they hadn’t even heard of her, much less all the activists who I learned about Disability and Autism and ableism from when my son and I were first diagnosed.

I was always letting teachers borrow the books I had anyway. I started to think that it might be a good idea to have a big collection of these types of books for anyone to borrow.

LeisLibrary1.jpgWe have an autism lending library in my state, but it did not have the types of books on Disability Rights and Neurodiversity that I thought were needed. Most of the books they have were written by parents or professionals. They were not written by the actual experts on the Autistic experience. There was nothing about the importance of learning about Disability History. There were books for siblings and peers of Autistic kids, but nothing to help Autistic kids find a sense of pride in their identity.

Is there special significance to the library’s name?

I named it after my dad. I just had a really good relationship with my dad growing up. Leislibrary3.jpgMost adults didn’t like me or thought I was a pain. He always thought I was awesome just as I was. My dad also was physically Disabled and I feel like if he was not Autistic, he definitely had some very strong Autistic traits. My dad died in 2002. It’s very hard for me to talk about still, but we (my sisters and I) grew up with both of our parents doing things like managing a food pantry and monthly free meals in the very economically depressed area where we lived. My parents both knew that things could be better and they felt responsible to be a part of making that happen and I think that was passed on to me. So, that’s why I named the library after my dad.

Would you explain a bit about the logistics of how you run the Library and when/where it is open, etc?

I am set up at my local community center from 11-3 every other Wednesday. I sometimes make appointments if people are unable to come to the library, and they can call or e-mail me and we make alternative arrangements… so that they can still borrow materials.

Can you share some of the feedback/response you are getting from others in your community, and beyond?

Well, since the library is new, I am still working on getting the word out locally. I have had some good response from a lot of parents though. Even some from other Autistic adults who are just wanting to learn more about neurodiversity.

There has also been a lot of great response from outside of my community. People have e-mailed me from as far away as Australia to ask me how to set up their own library. To me, that is so exciting because I think it would be great to see an autism acceptance library in every town!

Neurodiversity is a term or concept that is being used more and more frequently and sometimes seems misconstrued. How would you define Neurodiversity?

I like to use Nick Walker’s definition “Neurodiversity is the diversity of human brains and human minds.”

What are your next goals for the library and how can others help if they wish to do so? Pssst… Lei, this is an invitation for a shameless plug!

Haha. Well, I want to get more books and films. I’d love to be able to host events and guest speakers for the community.

Anyone who wants to contribute can go to our gofundme site: http://www.gofundme.com/edwileyautismacceptance

You can contact me at edwileyautismacceptance@gmail.com to send a check or money order to The Ed Wiley Autism Acceptance Lending Library

Or you can also go to my Amazon wishlist (and I recommend that you use amazon smile and choose Autism Women’s Network as your charity if you DO want to send materials to us from the wish list): http://amzn.com/w/1VS8J88S5ZQWH

Is there anything else you’d like to add??

Maybe I can also say that I couldn’t do this by myself. Like, my friend Jeff helped me to set up the bank account, get an EIN number, register as a non profit and do all that paperwork. Neil is my driver and delivery guy because I can’t drive. He also has done so much work in helping me when I get stressed out or can’t do something. Fallon helps me write book reviews (though we are on summer hiatus from that haha). My friend Irene helps a lot too. She is always promoting the library. My friends Robby and Gavin helped raise a lot of money by putting on that benefit show. Oh, and both Neil and Anabelle Listic helped me with graphics for the library. I want people to know that because I do need a lot of help to get things done and I couldn’t do it alone.

Interdependence!

Thank you, Lei ♥

In addition to creating and running the Library and working as the Community Outreach Coordinator for AWN, Lei is also a moderator of the Facebook pages for Boycott Autism Speaks and Parenting Autistic Children with Love and Acceptance (PACLA), writes a blog at We Always Liked Picasso Anyway, and was the co creator/editor of PACLA’s first magazine in April of this year. Lei is active in the online Autistic and Disabilities communities, and some would call her an social justice and civil rights activist. She is AWESOME!

Leiatthefundraiser.jpg_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in acceptance, Autism, Autistic, Father, Neurodiversity | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

#VectorsofAutism: The Live-tweet Storified

Yesterday Laura and friends live-tweeted Vectors of Autism: A documentary about Laura Nagle which can currently be viewed online here.

It was spectacularly well-received and created such a wonderful feeling of community. We were tweeting and connecting well before the 5:00pm PDT start time and long after the 39 minute film had been screened.

It was fun – and this was a real-life real-time echoing of exactly the thing that Laura talks about in the film when she describes twitter, phone in hand:

“I love Twitter. Right here at my fingertips is access to a virtual world in which people who are very diffuse – because there are not that many of us in any part of society – but here we are, hundreds of us… in the palm of my hand. And we.. we’re having different lives, but along various similar themes. And of course this is also impersonal/personal communication, which is about as good as it gets for one of us…”         ~ Laura Nagle: Vectors of Autism (33:21)

Last night many of us were all fortunate to find community in the palm of Laura’s hand… and there we were… in rapt and glorious celebration of acceptance and Autistic pride.

A huge thank you from Lei and Laura and me to all the other wonderful people who supported this event! And now…  Laura and I, and a few other people are considering a do-over… possibly in mid-September.

We’ll be sure to keep you posted…

In the meantime here is the storified version of yesterday’s live-tweet. Check it out and you will have a sense of how amazing the responses to this film have been.

If you haven’t watched Vectors of Autism…  you should!

And if you have… well then… you should watch it again!!

vectorsscreening Laura watching Vectors of Autism at the Arizona TASH Conference  in 2012     (Photo – Leah Kelley)
 

Vectors of Autism is currently available to view (for free) as part of the We speak, here, On-line Film Festival.

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

 

Posted in acceptance, Advocacy, Arizona TASH, Autism, Laura Nagle, Vectors of Autism | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sounding the Alarm… there is no acceptance here…

Screen shot 2014-07-18 at 1.37.36 AMOn Tuesday, July 15, I was still editing the comment below for the Autism Speaks docutrauma, Sounding the Alarm: Battling the Autism Epidemic, which is currently on Netflix. My intention was to leave it in the reviews section on Netflix with a one star review… and, to be honest, I was considering doing so without actually watching the film. Messages of fear and negative stigma about my child and other family members and my friends are not high on my list of the media I am eager to consume.

“As a mother of an Autistic teen and a Special Education Teacher, I find this film offensive.

I daily see the impact of the negative stigma spread by Autism Speaks. AS tells my child, my students and their families that Autistic people are a burden, an epidemic, and a tragedy.

I encourage those who view this film to look deeper… because the stigmatizing rhetoric in this film is a part of a constant stream of dehumanization and fear mongering from Autism Speaks and it needs to be ended.

I hope that after watching this, people will be curious to learn more about the experience of being autistic from Autistic people or an organization that includes Autistic people, rather than one that systematically silences them. Situated within disabilities communities, there are a multitude of sources of information that support Autistic people and their families with acceptance, and a strength-based perspective, such as the Autism Women’s Network, ASAN, and Parenting Autistic Children with Love and Acceptance (PACLA)

As an educator and a parent, I implore people to look beyond the limiting stance of Autism Speaks, and I invite them to become a part of the movement working to effectively support Autistic people as a valued part of diversity that is the human experience.”

I had read the other reviews that were being posted on the film and there were about 40, and in my estimate – 35 of them were negative. The reviews that were panning the film listed numbers like 22/22 people found this helpful, or 14/14 found this helpful, and conversely, the reviews that held the film in a favourable light had but 1 or 2 helpful votes.

I was considering a blog post… to get the word out that there were alternatives to this film and to encourage others to do express their concerns.

On Wednesday, July 16, almost all of the negative reviews had been disappeared

Frankly – I was shocked! Autistic people are used to being silenced and excluded from the conversation by Autism Speaks, but this was not something I expected from Netflix.  Go ahead… call me naive.

On Thursday, July 17, my friend, Lei Wiley-Mydske, announced that she was planning to watch the film and live-tweet it… and so I offered to join her.

I also explained to H what I was doing and why, and I invited him to join me. His response was, “Not a freakin’ chance! I’m not watching that crap!”

I am so glad he didn’t. It was far, far worse than I expected… and I hope everyone makes the same choice that H did.

I was grateful to watch the film with Lei, but it was difficult and I cannot recommend not watching Sounding the Alarm strongly enough…

A  few weeks have passed, and I feel I am finding my way to write about this. But I must admit afterwards I was shaken, angry, sad, frustrated… reeling! It reminded me how far we have to go to change the widespread stigma promoted by Autism Speaks. They are the big guys here, and they silence Autistic activists and those who care about them by saying they are fringe radicals, or they dismiss Autistic people by throwing around functioning labels as it meets their needs.

I really don’t have the capacity to say much more about this crappy experience, but fortunately I don’t need to because Lei has written an eloquent review of Sounding the Alarm for the Autism Women’s Network which you can find here. ♥ Thank you, Lei!

You can view the Storified version of our live-tweets here.

I will end with Lei’s Netflix review of the film, which is one of the comments that has been deleted:

Horrifying, and not because of Autism, but because of the disrespectful and dehumanizing way that this documentary treats it’s subjects. Autism is NOT a tragedy. Disability is NOT a tragedy. This is really disgusting fear mongering and if you care at all about the dignity and value of your Autistic loved ones, you will not watch this film.  Lei Wiley-Mydske

And if anyone else has a comment that was deleted from the Netflix I invite you to leave it in the comments below…

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in ableism, acceptance, Activist, ASAN, Autism, autism stigma, Autistic, Boycott Autism Speaks | Tagged , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Road Trip Activism… #BoycottAutismSpeaks

The other day H and I went on a road trip to Bellingham, WA. We talked long, as is our habit on lengthy drives, and had the chance to explore all sorts of topics. We also nabbed the chance to take a few photos in front of an Autism Speaks billboard.

We have driven by this billboard so many times – and each time I have cringed as we discuss the rhetoric promoted by Autism Speaks, because I wonder if the positive messages we give our son are enough to mitigate the constant barrage of negativity in the media.

But this time we stopped, and when we did so, I could see that H stood a little taller…

H and I will feel different from now on when we pass that sign because we shifted things to create a message of pride.  This action, though it may have been relatively small,  empowers him and builds his understanding that he has a right to rail against stigma and to fight for social justice.

ASBillboard4.jpgASBILLBOARD3.jpg

It was an opportunity to encourage and support H in rejecting negative stigma.

I want my son to stand strong against organizations and messages that work to tear him down, or shame him because of his neurology.

I want to my son to know that he is accepted…

That he is not broken…

That we all need support…

That he has a voice and perspectives that are valued…

That he has a right to be heard…

ASBillboard2.jpgImage description: A young man who is wearing a hoodie is standing in a grassy field looking toward an Autism Speaks Billboard which contains the 1 in 110 statistic about diagnosis and urges people to “Learn the signs.” A #BoycottAutismSpeaks sign has been added under the billboard. Text on image reads: “I want my son to stand strong against organizations and messages and that work to tear him down and shame him, or tell him he is broken, because of his neurology.I want him to feel proud that he is growing up to be an Autistic adult. That is why I #BoycottAutismSpeaks”
 

I want H to feel proud that he is growing up to be an Autistic adult.

That is why I boycott Autism Speaks!

Please check out these petitions and links to find out more and take action to support the Boycott Autism Speaks movement:

• Website: boycottautismspeaks.com

• On facebook: Boycott Autism Speaks

• On Twitter: @Boycott_AS (check out hashtags #BoycottAutismSpeaks and #EducateSesame)

• Petition: To the Corporate Sponsors of Autism Speaks

• Petition: to Sesame Street Reconsider Partnership with Autism Speaks

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in ableism, acceptance, Activist, Autism, autism stigma, Autistic, Boycott Autism Speaks | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Autistic Sun

“The image is called Autistic Sun.

That is what it stands for.

Do not trust the puzzle piece.

Do not live with fear.

Just be yourself.

Autistic people can make the world their own.”  H

HSunImageImage description: A mixed media painting (acrylic and black ink) of a golden sun peeking over green rolling hills, surrounded by a brilliant purple sky.  In the centre of the sun there is drawing of an open eye. Yellow rays, decorated with patterns and designs, radiate from the sun. A yellow road with a fence beside it leads across the hills to the horizon and follows the path to the sun as it fades into the distance.

LetterstoAutistickids.jpgH offered to share his painting for use on a new project, Letters to Autistic Kids: To Autistic kids from Autistic kids and Autistic adults (who used to be kids) with love and solidarity.

We need to signal boost this wonderful new project (curated by my spectacular friend Ibby ♥ of Tiny Grace Notes ) because these are the kinds of messages and resources our young people need.

 

Please check it out and give this wonderful site your support!

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

This post is part of the T-21 Down Wit Dat Blog Hop: Click here to enter your link and view the other participants.

Posted in acceptance, Autism, Autistic, Autistic People Speaking, Letters to Autistic Kids | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Blacksmith at the Forge + The Music of Invention

It is summer, and with summer comes that certain sense of freedom in the days that stretch before us filled with possibility.  It is like that one gift under the tree that hasn’t yet been opened. In all honesty, I like the idea of that feeling of possibility, more than anything the package could actually contain.

Summer is like that… if you approach it the right way; like an unopened present or a wonderfully long snow day.

We work to have some of that feeling every day for H, during the school year as well. That is a part of the reason we choose distance education to support us in home schooling our boy. We want him to have the freedom of possibility and the place and space and pace so that he has the resources to pursue his interests. We want him to have the room to explore, create, and problem solve with his inventive mind and curious nature, to succeed and to sometimes fail, and to practice the skills and attitudes of self-determination.

Today, on a day that I think is entirely too hot to choose such a workplace, H is tucked away in the garage. I smile at the rhythmic, metallic clang and pounding, eventually followed by the lovely squeek-swing-bang of the screen door, chased by the tapping of his shoes on the back stairs. At our house… this is the music of invention.

H comes in, exuberant, and very warm… and sooo proud it fills the room:

“I am a Mini Blacksmith. Look Mom! Look what I made!”

TuskenRaider1.jpgH had fashioned a Gaffi Stick for his Lego Tusken Raider out of a nail.

After H had cooled down a bit with the generous help of a popsicle… he explained:

“I made this the same way all blacksmiths do it. I heated up the nail a bit with a hand torch, which is a small butane welding torch, and I used a small hammer and anvil and pounded it until the end was flat. Then I had to cool it down in water. It hissed as it cooled. I learned how to do this by researching it on the internet.”

Tuskenraider2.jpgIt wasn’t until well into the cool of the evening that H revealed to me that he had actually forged three micro weapons.

TuskenRaider3.jpgAnd before he went to bed, he confidently declared, “It was a good day. I really am a blacksmith!”

I must concur with the blacksmith… it was a good day.

And now, in the cool relief of evening, I’m reflecting that a butane fueled torch isn’t going to cut it for long, and that H may eventually need a full size anvil and a larger hammer if he is going to work with the three-foot piece of steel that he recently acquired for his next project…

But my job in this, and it is harder than it seems, is to sit back and let him figure it out…

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

This post is part of the T-21 Down Wit Dat Blog Hop: Click here to enter your link and view the other participants.

Posted in advocate, Autism, Autistic, Distance Education, letting go, self-directed learning, Space and Pace | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#Crapcessibility

I have been hanging in Bellingham with my friend Corbett O’Toole, who raised a child with a disability and is disabled herself. We have had a spectacular time. We’ve seen a few sights, driven Chuckanut Drive, and enjoyed some fabulous meals – but the best part has been the chance to connect and talk about our experiences and how they intersect. I have been gifted with a sense of confidence about the next steps I need to take to support H’s development as he transitions to adulthood, and about my ability to support him in being his authentic self.

We’ve had frivolous moments, witty interludes, and deep conversations about a myriad of topics, from childhood development, to fear, to processing, to parenting, and activism in disability communities.

As Corbett was telling me about her hotel adventures on the first leg of her summer travels from San Fransisco to Bellingham, she shared that some of the access accommodations were less than helpful. She has been collecting pictures of signs and access issues and visually documenting some of the best and some of the worst. In her hotel, for instance, in a room that is supposed to accommodate someone who uses a wheelchair, they apparently assumed their patrons would have ability to levitate or to have telekinetic powers to psychically transport items through the time space continuum

So, as a non-physically disabled person it was eye-opening to me, as is often the case when we come from the perspective of not needing a certain accommodation – or having issues of access. This has also been the case for me in with my interactions with Autistic people; it helped me understand the needs of those who might experience the world differently.

I was shaking my head in disbelief, and Corbett and I were both being sarcastic and rolling our eyes…

I said, “This is not access, this is crapcess”

…and thus the term crapcessibility was born…

Crapcessibility2Photo description: Corbett is sitting sideways to a very high sink (it’s at the height of her armpit) with her elbow on the top of the sink and a toothbrush in her hand. She is wearing a tshirt that says “Criptiques” (from the book). The text below the photo says: “Crapcessibility: pioneering a new trend… the armpit high sink…” In smaller text: “#crapcessibility” and “Thirty Days of Autism: Leah Kelley” (Image description by Corbett O’Toole)

Thank you, Corbett ♥

Your friendship, your fabulousness, your commitment to social justice, and your willingness to share your perspective and experience are very much appreciated.

You can explore Corbett’s collection of writing and body of work on her website at: www.corbettotoole.com

Corbett’s oral history can be found at: http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/collections/drilm/collection/items/otoole.html.

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

 

Posted in ableism, Activist, Autism, Corbett O'Toole, Crapcessibility, perspective of others | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Why a teacher??? #thisismystrikepay #BCTF

Today on the picket lines, my colleagues and I were approached by a woman with two adorable dogs. I asked permission to take a picture of her sweet basset hound to use on social media in support of the strike.

She immediately agreed and was delightfully supportive of us teachers and what we are trying to achieve.

As we chatted, focused on getting the dog and one of our picket signs to align in the photo, she suddenly looked up at me… and then simultaneously hugged me as she queried, “OMG – Ms. Kelley?!?” 

She recognized me…

I taught her son, Ty, when he was in Grade 2…

I immediately remembered him…

I somehow even pulled his last name out of my teacher hat…

She reminded me of the Circus Show movie I made with that class (as I did with many of my classes) and how we made it look like her boy was shot out of a cannon.  We subtly <sarcasm> created a stunt double with a plasticine figure on a piece of wire for the part where he was blasting across the room. It was very high-tech…

If I recall correctly, Ty may also have been the Ring Master in our film.

These films were a hoot. I had an old, very heavy VHS camera, upon which I had to edit the film as we were recording. And though our special effects may have been a little sketchy, my primary classes and I recorded circus shows and fairy tales and such, where every child in my class had a role and was a star. I suppose I was director, producer, camera person, crowd-control, and pied piper, but the kids were stars and we worked together make the sets and the costumes and plan the shows. Sometimes the camera was shaking because I was laughing so hard, and Ty’s mom told me that I can be heard laughing on the recording of that year’s movie project.

After we were done we would invite the students’ families to our Premier, and then I painstakingly copied a video for every student. And truth be told, today is not the first time I have heard that one of these videos is still a treasured relic from a primary school past.

I am so grateful that Ty’s mom shared with me the impact I had on her son and how the experience of being accepted shaped his feelings about himself. This kid was a live-wire and needed time and assurance, and I spent many-a-day at the end of class talking with this parent and working out strategies with her to positively support the development of her child.

That is what we do as teachers.

We change lives…

Sometimes with little things…

Or in ways we may never see…

I needed this reminder.

I am a facilitator, conflict management negotiator, counselor, confidant, cheer leader, researcher, social worker, shoe tier, lunch maker, firm reliable guide, band-aid provider, crossing guard, co-learner, reader, curriculum organizer and creator, equipment demonstrator, actress, singer, poet, comedian, furniture mover, artist, dream giver, hot lunch distributor, role model, political and human rights activist, cartoonist, tear wiper, scientist, sociologist, puppeteer, group dynamics expert, leader, writer, eraser provider, story-teller, advocate, opportunity creator, inclusionist, supporter of diversity, bridge builder, pied piper…

… I am a teacher!

What a treat it was to meet this parent from so many years ago…

And to hear about this little blonde boy, Ty, who is 26 now…

He is getting married this summer… and they are showing the movie at the reception!

This is my strike pay!

Hound.jpg* A final note: It is of critical importance to understand that 18 years ago, when I taught the class that Ty was in, my class size was usually between 18-20 students, and I had the time to pay attention to each child, and take on projects that stretched all of us to our creative limits. This was prior to 2002, when the language for class size and composition was still in our contract. I am so appreciative of the lovely interaction today with Ty’s mom, that has me thinking back on all the amazing child-centred learning and projects that I was able to undertake with my students. I am renewed in my conviction that we need to continue to fight return class size and composition language to our contracts, and to take a stand to protect public education.

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in Autism, BC Teachers Federation, BCTF, Educator, social justice | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Uncomfortable… So what?!?

30-days-of-autism-and-einstein-quoteI have been thinking about how often we are uncomfortable with feeling uncomfortable (which I cannot help but note is ironically circular in its very definition), and that I have observed and experienced the inherently powerful and positive opportunity that exists in how we choose to respond to our discomfort.

When considering this from a cognitive perspective, uncomfortable is often the response to the metaphorical wedge of new ideas, or a perspective that differs from what we have held as truth. These feelings of discomfort – sometimes referred to as cognitive dissonance – can function as a barometer of sorts, indicating that we need to pay attention and seek out more information, and re-evaluate what we considered to be our truth.

When I am questioning my assumptions and broadening my perceptions to be inclusive of the experience of others, when I am curious and listening, then I am adjusting my subjective reality… and that is when growth and change happens. Digging-in to these moments has at times shaken me to my core, but it has also resulted in some of my deepest and most profound learning and understanding.

That uncomfortable feeling of cognitive dissonance acts as the indicator that points me to something I need to be considering. If I am responsive to this, it denotes something important and asserts: “pay attention to this – this doesn’t align.”  I will continue to resist the seemingly natural urge to respond to discomforting signifiers with avoidance or denial… and work instead to be willing to deeply question my assumptions and my stance.

It may not be comfortable… and working to be comfortable with discomfort may not be easy, but so what?!? I will continue to lean in…

Photo: L. Kelley: Thirty Days of Autism

Photo: L. Kelley: Thirty Days of Autism

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

 

 

 

Posted in Autism, being wrong, discomfort avoidance, Handling Change, handling discomfort, listening, Loud Hands | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Liquid Man – A Poem of Acceptance #StopCombatingMe

#stopcombatingmeIf you follow my blog you will know my family lives in Vancouver, Canada – and it may appear that we are removed from what happens with bills and acts and legislation in the US – but the reality is – we are very much affected. Sometimes a struggle, like the fight for human rights and social justice, must by necessity transcend borders. This is one of those times. I wrote this poem for H and others…

Liquid Man

 

15

I see you perched on the edge

A balanced droplet

Reflecting back the whole world

Defying gravity

Rocking softly

Regrouping

With gently swayed rhythm 

Considering

Owning your body’s movements

Choosing curled still solitude

 

 

23

I see you sliding down a wall

The edge that keeps you

Gives solace

Defining your space

You say awkward

Some might accuse: flop

(they know not)

I see ownership of liquid beauty

You puddle on the floor

Relaxed fails as a descriptor

Your words are spinning

Weaving thoughts

Spinning

And I can hardly keep up

But the vision of your

Wall water self

Exploring concrete edges

That anchor

As your thoughts

go to places far and wide

The naturalness

The beauty in the authentic

The message in that move

Is nourishment

Joy

 

 

52

I see you reflected

And reflecting

And dazzling

Water in water

Connections

Ripples felt as you move

Flowing

Seamless

Sound and movement amplified

Emotions intensified

The Butterfly Effect

Transformative

Connected in the wake

Or the wave

The pebble in the pond

Affecting one other

We pool

Liquid

Reflected

Movement

 

 

15, 23, 52

I see the silent power of your liquid ways

Refusal to be contained

Stuffed down

Boxed in

Shaking off shame’s plea for a discrete mopping

Water protests, in all its liquid forms:

Drops, tears, puddles, pools, and oceans wide

To combat the stream is folly

It is to miss the moment of perfect stillness

Where the whole world is reflected

That convex bead

Tenuous balance held forever

In the present tense of poetry

Defiant

Destined to be triumphant

This is the power of persistence…

Rail against the rock

And honour yourself in all your watery forms

Leah Kelley, March 10, 2014

#stopcombatingmeThis post is part of the #StopCombatingMe Flashblog scheduled for March 18, 2014.  Please visit this site to find out about submissions and to view other participating posts.

You can find more information about this action and tell Congress to reform the Combating Autism Act or to let it expire.  Sign the petition and learn more here:  http://action.autisticadvocacy.org/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=10412

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in acceptance, Activist, ASAN, Autism, Autism Poem, social justice | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Ode to the Stim: the printable sequel

I have received a number of requests for printable copies of this poem. Here it is – as a jpeg – which should be easy to print if you so choose.

Image description: White background framed in blue. There is a poem beside a stick figure drawing of a happy looking person flapping their arms. Text reads:  "Ode to the Stim. H stims… I stim too… bounce and wiggle, twist a lock, hold tight to that ‘calming rock’, fiddle and fold, squint and spin, squeeze, and then begin again, shoes too big so toes can move, wiggly legs that find their groove, Tom Sawyer pockets with fidgits galore, quiet hands are such a bore.  Leah Kelley – July 27, 2013. Thirty Days of Autism. To stim is to breathe... Honour the stim...

Image description: White background framed in blue. There is a poem beside a stick figure drawing of a happy looking person flapping their arms. Text reads: “Ode to the Stim. H stims… I stim too… bounce and wiggle, twist a lock, hold tight to that ‘calming rock’, fiddle and fold, squint and spin, squeeze, and then begin again, shoes too big so toes can move, wiggly legs that find their groove, Tom Sawyer pockets with fidgets galore, quiet hands are such a bore. Leah Kelley – July 27, 2013. Thirty Days of Autism. To stim is to breathe… Honour the stim… “

Again, I could write more about this… but I still think this visual pretty much sums it up for me right now. Additionally, there are already some amazing posts that say what I would like to say or consider… so I am linking them up here:

Socially Inappropriate by Musings of an Aspie

Things my autistic kids love: Public transit by Small But Kinda Mighty

Way-To-Stim Wednesday: Video Series by Anabelle Listic

Stimming by Outrunning the Storm

Quiet Hands by Julia Bascom

Enjoy!!

______________________________________________________________

30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

©Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2013)   

Posted in acceptance, Autism, Loud Hands, poem, poetry, stim | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Live-tweeting Vectors of Autism with Laura Nagle: An invitation

Vectors of Autism posterAutistic people and those who love and support them are working hard to take a stand against negative and stigmatizing messages about the experience of being Autistic. It can be exhausting and can feel like an uphill battle counter the caustic vitriol that spews from powerful organizations such as Autism Speaks.

A few weeks back, my friend, Lei Wiley-Mydske, and I live-tweeted as we watched Autism Speaks’ gross docutrauma (frickety frack, I love neologisms) “Sounding the Alarm: Battling the Autism Epidemic” which you can read about here and here.

But fortunately there is a flip side to this negativity.

There are films and voices and resources that are created by or involve Autistic people in an honouring way, and that give insight into the experience of being autistic. These contain important and helpful messages and information about the kinds of supports that are needed and how we might accommodate neurodiversity and disability, without the stigma of fear, burden and tragedy.

The film, Vectors of Autism: a documentary about Laura Nagle, is a wonderful example of this. It captures Laura’s story with sensitive insight, revealing her strengths and her challenges, and gifts us with Laura’s eloquent explanation of her experience of the world.

I am of course very much in love with this film, and I will disclose my bias as I have been involved with this project for a number of years now. I will disclose as well that Laura and I have become close friends and so promoting this film is something to which I happily commit. Time and time again I have heard from people that they fall in love with this film, and I think they fall in love with Laura too. I know I did.

So… here’s the thing…

Vectors of Autism is currently available to view (for free) as part of the We speak, here, On-line Film Festival.

And Lei and I were thinking that it would be really cool to live-tweet Vectors as a way to restore balance to the universe after our last endeavour, and focus on something marvelous.  It is also a fun way to spread the word out about Vectors, because the film with the most views wins a prize in the festival – and frankly the prize money will allow Vectors to be entered into more festivals.

And then our spark of an idea started to grow and my lovely friend and STAR of the film, Laura Nagle, agreed to join our flash-film-fest live-tweet as well.

So this coming Sunday, August 10th at 5:00 pm, PDT, Laura, Lei, and I will be live-tweeting as we view the film and we would like to invite you to join us.

We will all watch at the same time and tweet highlights, quotes, favourite parts, and reactions simultaneously…

If there are only the three of us… that will be fine.

But if many people join us and this becomes a thing, well… the bigger the better as far as we are concerned because it is an opportunity to come together to take part in a positive action to signal boost this film.

We intend to meet up on twitter at about 4:45 on Sunday to countdown to 5:00 and sync up our starting time.

Please follow and join in with the hashtag #VectorsofAutismLivetweetvectors3.jpgHere are a few other reviews of Vectors of Autism (so you can check beyond my obvious bias):

http://unstrangemind.wordpress.com/2014/08/02/laura-nagle-vectors-of-autism

http://emmashopebook.com/2012/07/12/vectors-of-autism-laura-nagle/

http://www.newswise.com/articles/of-vectors-and-spectrums-documentary-touches-humanity-of-autism

Screen shot 2014-08-06 at 11.07.33 PM

 

We are so excited and hope you will join us!!

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

Posted in acceptance, Autism, autism stigma, Autistic, Documentary, Laura Nagle, Snarfly, Vectors of Autism | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

On Literature for Children and Co-creating Meaning

AKA: For Sophie with Love…

I read Kate DiCamillo’s Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane to H a couple of years ago. We both loved it! It is a raw but touching tale about being yourself and love and acceptance – and it has parts that made both of us cry. We need to be giving children literature like this: powerful books with so many layers, and so rich in meaning and depth.

Despereaux Sketch.jpgI also read Kate DiCamillo’s The Tale of Despereaux  to both H and my primary class. Hard not to cry for that one too. Thus, my son and students got to see an adult in their lives cry. I think that is a gift to them – an authentic response to good literature… and a glimpse into our inner workings. When we share our appraisal, we gift them with our sensitivity. There is power in the message: “This really touches my heart… It is safe and okay to feel things deeply and be so moved.”

When H was noticeably struggling with loss and grief, and I was reading books with him to support and assist him with his processing of this, he would look to me,  as we were reading and measure his response against mine. He would study my face… and then ask, “This is a sad part, isn’t it Mom? Are you feeling sad too?”

When I had a grade 2 or 3 class, prior to becoming a special ed teacher, I always read aloud to my students. I believe with conviction that reading aloud to children gives them access to the literature they cannot yet access themselves. This scaffolding stretches the edges of the world for our children – and we are right there with them to answer questions or reflect – or support them in understanding relationships or connections in the bigger world.

When we read aloud to children (and even young adults), we build the stage for a shared experience of new worlds and ideas and the opportunity to safely explore perspectives and co-create meaning.

I loved to read Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. This is a crusty old story written in 1910, which is rich with prejudice, classism, ableism, and imperialism. However,  paired with these values that we’d love to see remain lost in the last century, are huge opportunities to discuss and explore these very relevant topics with young people. There are issues and examples of trust, betrayal, loss, questionable integrity, and resiliency. Encountering these concepts within a work of fiction provides a safe forum to examine complex relationships, and responses to trauma, and what we value at our core. This is also a wonderful book for teaching about inside voice and self-talk, as there are examples of the characters’ inner dialogue and cognition throughout the entire tale. We are able to observe the outside action of the characters and their interactions with each other – but additionally – we are able to see the inner workings of the characters as they are revealed with their shared thoughts.

Uncle Jed’s Barbershop (Margaree King Mitchell) My lovely daughter, Nika, now 21, used to occasionally check this book out of her school’s library when she was in Kindergarten and Grade 1.  It always came as a relief – a tiny island of fiction in the endless sea of non-fiction dinosaur books she would tote home. This story always made me cry… and she used to tease me about that tirelessly. It is a story about goals and generosity and love and sacrifice… and I haven’t read it for years and years (and perhaps my response would be different now) but the memory of this resonates with me still.

I also read picture books aloud. I love the layering of message and multiple meanings that is added with the visual text of illustration. And – yes, of course many of my students could access these independently, but modeling the phrasing and the tone, and the energy I can bring to reading is another kind of scaffolding that brings a book alive and lights a fire for the love of literature.

I love to read aloud using voices, and have always been good at voicing characters and even at adding accents. This brings the story alive, and pulls the listener into the tale.

And… I can reread a sentence that is beautifully constructed… teach how my voice rises with a question, teach the power of the explanation mark – or quotations – and expand vocabulary with rich new language – clearly placed in a well-defined context – rather than in isolation. I can let the words roll off my tongue and be massaged with appreciation for their sound and feel, and then adjust the volume – or the speed – ever so slightly – to draw the children in… and have them begging for more.

Young people need us to help them fall in love with words and story and literature. And good stories… the best of them… give us little glimpses of ourselves… and our possibilities… and the best in all of us.

Here are a few more of my favourites:

Robert Munsch: I’ll Love you Forever

Robert Munsch: The Paperbag Princess

Robert Munsch: A Promise is a Promise

John Bianchi: Swine Snafu

David Small: Eulalie and the Hopping Head

Yorinks:  Louis the Fish   (There is a Reading Rainbow video of this story here)

Mordecai Richler: Jacob Two-Two and the Hooded Fang

Annette LeBox: Miss. Rafferty’s Rainbow Socks

Roald Dahl: James and the Giant Peach

Kevin Henkes: Chrysanthemum

Kevin Henkes: Lily’s Purple Plastic Purse

Simon Puttock: Big Bad Wolf is Good

EB White: Charlotte’s Web

Kate DiCamillo: Because of Winn Dixie

Ahhhh… powerful stories… subversive stories… inside stories… stories about identity and being your true self, stories that resonate and make you fall in love with words and worlds.

I invite you to add your favourites here as well ♥

____________________________________________________________

30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

©Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)   

Posted in Autism, Children's Literature, connections, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Megan Metcalfe: I don’t want you to “negotiate” #BCTF #bced

The following is a guest post by BC Parent, Megan Metcalfe:

I sent a letter to Christie Clark’s office, Peter Fassbender’s office, and my MLA about two weeks ago. I got a response just today. It was addressed from the Premier’s office, but it was not signed and there was no name connected to it. It was the most bland, uninformative “yes, thanks for your input, we’re doing our best, yada, yada, yada” kind of letter.

So I sent this back:

Hm. I would address this to an individual, but no one signed the form letter that was sent to me. I do thank you for at least replying to me. But I find the content of your reply to be quite empty and void of real concern or discussion.
I am an open-minded individual, and I like to pride myself on listening to both sides of any story, but I am angry right now, angrier than I’ve ever been as an adult citizen of Canada.

You see, I feel that the provincial government’s actions at this time in history are unconstitutional.

I feel that my son’s years in school have been decimated, specifically and directly as a result of decisions that have been made to support the wealthy via tax cuts at the expense of our educational system.

Your very large, very expensive ads to denigrate the teachers’ position in the negotiations included incorrectly done math!! Is it that the people you had construct these ads are incompetent, or is it that you think the people of BC are stupid enough to believe the incorrectness of the ad? Either avenue does not bode well for the perception of the liberal government.

I have heard the analogy used, and I think it’s a pretty good one, that if a family needs to “tighten its belt” financially, it doesn’t go buy a Lamborghini then say it can’t afford groceries. This seems to be what the choices of the Liberal government reflect. It’s not that the money doesn’t exist, clearly if we can spring for a roof on a stadium to the tune of 514 Million dollars, there is money available, the only question is, what will we spend it on?

I believe, from what I have read, what has been shared with me, and from what actions I’ve seen the Liberals take, that there is not only a personal vendetta against teachers, but an all out war on proper education for the masses. I think you are making every effort to create a two-tiered educational system. High end for the wealthy, low-end for the economically struggling. And I don’t like it. And I will stand up against it.

You are taking advantage of teachers’ good hearts, their empathetic natures, their unselfishness, because you KNOW that what they are responsible for isn’t a product on an assembly line. IT’S OUR KIDS. It’s MY kid, with his double challenges of giftedness/learning disability. He’s a BRILLIANT BOY and he’s being allowed, like so many other wonderful Canadian kids to fall through the cracks in an overcrowded, underfunded school system.

Does Ms. Clark want to go down in history as the heartless human she’s appearing to be, remembered for her attempt to assassinate quality education? Or does she want to be remembered as the politician who truly put the most noble ideals, education and healthcare, FIRST, for Canada’s kids and for BC’s future?

You see, I used to blame teachers too. I couldn’t figure out why my son hated school so very, very much. Then I started going in to the school (which I wish more parents would do). Spending time there. Talking to teachers. Watching them cope under the most awful, awful conditions. I’ve seen so many kids so much worse off than my son. And slowly, slowly I began to realize that this wasn’t their fault. My son is a good kid. Polite, quiet. Smart, mostly. But he often became “the straw that broke the camel’s back” because of his need, REAL need for one-on one teaching with an adult, in order to succeed. And he was one of those kids that would’ve qualified for a full-time aid years ago, which means that his entire young life would have been different, if different decisions, decisions that showed some concern for our children, had been made.

I have had teachers cry with me over my kids’ challenges and celebrate with me over their successes. I share my parenting role with these people, as do most of the voters in BC. I recognize and respect that they are almost as important in influence as I am in my children’s lives. Why, please tell me, why would you not care about these people? As a single mother, Ms. Clark, surely you know that taking care of, nurturing, watching over and educating children is a grueling, often thankless job. Most of us struggle with the role even when we only have to deal with our OWN kids, let alone 30 of them, day after day!!

I WANT my taxes to pay my children’s teachers WELL. I want them to have excellent health benefits, plenty of time in the summer to connect with their own families and hone those “kid” skills. I want them not to be overstressed, not overburdened, not burned out, as ALL of us get when there is simply too much asked of us with too few resources!

I want the person co-raising my kids to be at their absolute BEST. They are helping me, and all of us average Canadians, raise our children. Is there a more important job??

Now, does my statement put me on the Liberals’ radar as someone to be feared? Silenced? Or do you see the folly in pursuing what will be a guaranteed defeat politically for this government if they don’t heed the message of the province’s people?

I don’t want you to “negotiate”. I don’t want you to work out some compromise with the teachers. I want you to give them EXACTLY what they are asking for, because what they are asking will change the lives of every child and every caring parent in British Columbia for the better and for the long-term. And I want to see you stand up and accept a lot of accolades for finally, FINALLY doing the right thing. For BC. For our children. For the future.

I expect and demand a reply.

From an individual that will sign their name to the paper.

My sincere thanks in advance for your attending to this matter immediately.

                   Megan Metcalfe

_________________

Megan Metcalfe    (Photo  from http://www.meganmetcalfe.com/bio/ - used with permission)

Megan Metcalfe (Photo from http://www.meganmetcalfe.com/bio/ – used with permission)

I must extend my appreciation to fellow BC parent, Megan Metcalfe, for her solidarity and for allowing me to share her spectacular letter.  Megan is a talented Vancouver musician, who is working on her third album.  I encourage you to check out her facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/meganmetcalfemusic and have a listen to her wonderful music there or on her website at http://www.meganmetcalfe.com.

Thank you, Megan ♥

__________________________________________

Please sign and share this petition to Premier Clark: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/373/030/758/premier-clark-negotiate-with-teachers-to-protect-public-education/

_________________________________________________________ 30 Days of Autism is a project designed to promote social understanding and offer a glimpse into the perspectives of those whose lives are touched by Autism.

© Leah Kelley, Thirty Days of Autism (2014)

 

 

Posted in Christy Clark, Collective Responsibility, Educator, Parent, Public Education, Silence, Special Education | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments